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Apr 16 2012
By: TSD_-RAVEN- Lombax Warrior 124 posts
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ROUTER PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

[ Edited ]
23 replies 96073 views Edited Mar 31, 2013

If anyone has any specific questions about Router/PS3 setup, feel free to send me a PM and I'll do what I can to help.

 

This post is a modified version of my popular post  "Router Port Forwarding, Triggering, & QoS Setup for Killzone 2"  on the Playstation KZ Discussion Forums. I've specifically updated that post here with Battlefield 3 Port Data and my own current Router screen shots examples containing BF3 / EA & PS3 / PSN Port settings. If you're experiencing a lot of game drops, freezes, and lag, the information here should help you decrease most, if not all of it.

 

This post is also applicable to Xbox and PC gaming, though the specific ports are different between platforms (see the Port Data link above). Keep in mind that while this will help improve your local network communications and eliminate many game freeze/disconnect problems, those that are server-side or game code issues none of us can do anything about except wait for the fixes and updates.

 

This information is targeted toward those with little or no experience/knowledge in Router setups, and why Port Forwarding on your Router is essential for smooth online multiplayer gameplay. It should be noted that most Router manufacturers started including more detailed information on Port setups in the Advanced section of their online manuals (at least Linksys has) to specifically cover gaming consoles, so be sure to check your own manual for more information. I've also added information that will cover setups for older Routers, though not specifically indicated. If you're using a Jurassic era Router, upgrading to a newer N Router will defiinitely help your game. For those that already own an older Draft N / DBN Router, the newer N Routers since the Wireless N Standard was ratified definitely outperform the Draft N hardware significantly, in most cases by over 100mbps.

 

I've used and set up Linksys Networks for myself and clients for many years. The reason I prefer Linksys is that their Advanced Configuration Settings (which you need to access manually regardless of what brand Router you own) is extremely straighforward, laid out well in the Administration Panel screens, and very easy to understand/configure once you understand the basics of Port Forwarding. The same cannot be said of other brands. I would also recommend that whatever hardware you use, keep the hardware within the same brand, as they're manufactured to work best with their own products. I also recommend only Simultaneous Dual-Band N Routers if you can upgrade to them; I speak about that in another section of this post as to their advantages.

 

For most Game Port setups and PS3/PSN Ports, you'll need to use both Triggering and Port Range Forwarding anyway, given the number of ranges required to be applied. I normally use Triggering for the PS3/PSN Ports, and Range Forwarding for Game Ports, but you can switch however you like.

 

 

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PORT SETTING OPTIONS?

 

A port is simply an electronic door that opens/closes as needed for your local network operations. Think of your Router as a cable box with a single IP address, and each port is like an individual TV channel that can be accessed as required. Single Port Forwarding allows you to keep a single port address open all the time; Port Range Forwarding allows for opening a range of ports; and Port RangeTriggering (the best option) allows for ports to only open/close as required when triggered by request from the application/game/server that requires the port to be open to pass data through. Port RangeTriggering and Port Range Forwarding are the most common and best used options for gaming setup, given the port range requirements of most games/applications.

 

WHY NOT JUST USE A DMZ OPTION?

 

For those lazy idiots who follow the DMZ option, here's the reality; you're opening up ALL of your ports to the world, and if you believe you're immune from port scanning and hacking, then by all means, use it. DMZ's were a viable option about 10 years ago when Port Forwarding options were limited and harder to set up; the world is a bit more complicated now. If you think you've got problems now, wait until your DMZ'd device gets picked up by trolling port bots and you start getting waves of incoming port attacks.

 

The bottom line is to only set up ports that you absolutely need to have open/triggered for the applications/games you're using.

 

QUALITY OF SERVICE

 

Quality of Service, or QoS, is a setup feature on most modern Routers over the last several years. Essentially, it allows you to give any network device, port, game, application, etc., head-of-line access privileges to the Router.

 

It's important to understand how your Router functions within your network. At any given time, the Router is constantly being requested for permission by home network devices (PC's, mobile devices, game consoles, smartphones, TV's, etc.) and applications to access the Internet. The problem with extremely important data (such as gaming streams) is that unless you've set up QoS to allow your data/device priority access to the Router, your game data is just one of many requests in the queue, and the Router will process it on its timetable, not yours. Having automatic updates set on your PC's doesn't help either (nor should you use them anyway, except for virus definition updates) as those applications are constantly accessing the Router / Internet looking for updates.

 

If you're unfamiliar with Router setups, then go to your router manufacturer site and go to their support area. Many have basic networking tutorials, and the manual for your router will show you where the settings are. For those who have Linksys Routers, I have added my own particular Linksys Dual-Band N Router settings, including the Port Range / Port Trigger / QoS data I'm using, below.

 

 

ROUTER TYPES AND SPEEDS / WIRED vs. WIRELESS

 

All Routers have Ethernet (wired) capability, virtually all modern Routers have wireless capability as well. The only differences are the wireless standards they're designed with, and whether or not they have multiple bandwidth options.

 

Wireless connections (Wireless N) are faster than Ethernet; Ethernet, while a more stable connection, is a lot slower than Wireless N speeds. Ethernet connections will only reach a top speed of 100mbps, while current Wireless N technology has been rated at 450mbps (standard rate is 300mbps). The misconception that wired is faster goes back to the Wireless A, B, and G Router days, when the top speed you could attain was 54mbps (G). For those that still think wired is faster, consider basic electronics and physics; Wireless is radio, and radio moves at light speed. Data throughput cannot move that fast through a wired conductor.

 

For 1gb throughput enable Routers, it's important to understand that it's a theoretical limit that is only approachable under lab conditions. In the real world, attaining that speed on a home LAN with consumer equipment isn't realistic.

 

For a good read on understanding throughput, read this article from HP:

 

Understanding Throughput on the 1GB Ethernet

 

Ethernet vs. the PS3's internal Wireless Adapter (a 54mbps Wireless G) is another common cause for gamers believing that Ethernet is faster than Wireless. If you're referring strictly to the PS3's hardware capability, then yes, Ethernet is faster (100mbps vs. 54mbps). However, when configured properly using an external Wireless N Adapter/Bridge and Wireless N Router, that notion goes away, Wireless N being 3 times faster than Ethernet (300mbps).

 

Wireless is, however, subject a lot more to environmental interference (building structure, interference from other devices, range, etc.), but if you learn what the problems are and how to deal with them, you can negate most or all of them.

 

For Wireless N Routers, there are 3 types:

 

Wireless N - Single band Wireless N standard Router, using overlapping frequencies of 2.4ghz and 5ghz.

 

Selectable Dual-Band N - Wireless N Router allowing you to SELECT either 2.4ghz or 5ghz band for your network, but not both at the same time. Essentially it's useless, since it's pretty much the same as a regular Wireless N Router but more expensive, and you get nothing for the extra money.

 

Simultaneous Dual-Band N - Wireless N Router that allows you to use both 2.4ghz and 5ghz bands at the same time, in effect giving you 2 network bands in one Router. I've been recommending and using them since the first Draft DBN's appeared on the market in 2006; I still use, recommend, and install them for clients. For home online gaming, there is no better option for speed and flexibility.

 

As an example of my own setup, I stream my business and gaming data over the 5ghz network band, while other devices in my house (family PC's, phones, etc.) are streamed over the 2.4ghz network band. Since they're separate, they don't interfere with each other. Add in QoS setup to prioritize the PS3 / PSN / Game data, and you've got a clean game stream that's optimized for Router priority access and connectivity.

 

Again, it's easier to use Port Range Forwarding or Triggering instead of Single Port Forwarding. In those cases where there isn't a range but only a single port listed, your range is the same port, e.g., Range 5223-5223 for Port 5223. Port Triggering is also preferable to Port Forwarding, since Triggering relies on the game or application in question to trigger the Port request when necessary to the Router. Static Port Forwarding setups keep your Ports open as long as they are enabled in the Router setting, and as such are more vulnerable. Trigger Ports are only open as long as the game or application needs them to be open.

 

 

PS3 & ROUTER PORTS

 

There is specific Port data that you need to have setup on your Router for PS3-PS3 online communications, Playstation Network communication, and proper communication with the gaming server for the game you happen to be playing.

 

There is also specific Port data required for certain games - for such data you need to contact the game publisher or check their site. Most of them will give you the data if you email them or call; DICE has already posted their Battlefield 3 Port data information online and referenced hundreds of times in online communications via Social Media. The other option is to check the Port data on PortForward.com - however, be aware that sometimes their data isn't up to date and occasionally only has the PS3/PSN Ports, and not all game ports listed for your game. Make sure you're using the Port data for the specific platform you're playing on. PortForward.com separates Port data by platform. DICE has had all Port settings available online for all platforms for Battlefield 3 since the Beta release.

 

Here is the basic PS3/PSN Port Configuration Data for PS3 format games and the Playstation Network, and the current Battlefield 3 ports. You can either set it up as a Port Forward, or Port Trigger.

 

For all PLAYSTATION 3 format software titles (Sony published or otherwise)

 

ROUTER NAT AND UPnP MODES - ENABLED

 

Contrary to what some think, the NAT (Network Address Translation) level is not a specific setting that you can adjust. NAT must be enabled on your Router, as well as UPnP (Plug 'n Play). The NAT level you see in the Network Status you run on your PS3 is an indication of how well your system is communicating on the ; you must have a NAT 2 for proper communication between PS3's. However, if you run a status and see a NAT level 2 before beginning any online games, chats, etc., it's misleading - only after you begin online communication with another PS3 will your true NAT level be revealed. And realistically, if it's not a NAT level 2, you're not going to be communicating properly anyway. This is apparent when you think you've got a NAT 2, but can't seem to initiate an online chat between yourself and other PS3 users. If it happens, check your NAT level immediately after it happens - many times it's a NAT problem related to Port setup.

 

For newer Routers, UPnP and NAT are usually Enabled by default; for older Routers, it must be selected. DO NOT ASSUME it's selected.

 

*Note: For Ports that are both TCP/UDP, select Both (newer Routers); if you have an older Router that doesn't have "Both" as an option, select TCP or UDP as indicated, then select Full Duplex to enable data pass-through in both directions. A good example here is PS3 Port 10070.

 

PLAYSTATION 3 Ports:

 

TCP Ports: 10070 - 10080 Remote Play via Access Point: TCP 9293

UDP Ports: 10070 Voice Chat: UDP 6000-7000, 10070 (for headset operation)

 

*For Port 10070-10080, just set the Port setting to Both.

 

PLAYSTATION Network: TCP Ports: 80, 443, 5223 UDP Ports: 3478, 3479, 3658

 

BATTLEFIELD 3 PS3 Ports:

 

TCP Ports: 80, 443, 9988, 10000-10100, 17502, 42127

UDP Ports: 3659, 14000-14016

 

 

ROUTER PORT FORWARDING AND TRIGGERING SETUP EXAMPLES

 

Below are screen shots of my own Router setup for both Port Triggering and Port Range Forwarding. Note the Destination IP is the IP address of my PS3; if you're using an external adapter (connected to the PS3's Ethernet port in the back), you'd set the IP address to that of the adapter, not the PS3. Note that the name can be anything you wish - I use the Trigger range.

 

Note for those using an external adapter (essential if you want to get N speeds out of an N Router), your PS3 Network Settings are set to Wired, not Wireless. This bypasses the internal PS3 wireless adapter and connects directly to the external, which then connects at higher speed to the Router than the PS3's adapter can. For newer PS3's and Routers, selecting Easy during Network Settings setup will do this; however, for older PS3's and Routers, it's better to do a Manual setup using Wired.

 

You should also always Reserve the IP address of your PS3 & any other network devices  (DHCP Reservation) to ensure that your PS3/external adapter is always set to the same IP address, in case power goes out to your Router, you need to do a power reset, or you need to reset it to default settings. I can't stress enough the importance of saving your setting configurations; if you have to do a hard reset to factory defaults for any reason, all you'll need to do is restore that configuration. Otherwise you'll need to redo everything from the beginning.

 

IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT that you remember to SAVE YOUR SETTINGS after you've entered your Ports BEFORE you leave the Router Admin screen you're on, or anything you've entered won't be saved.

 

Note below for Port Range Triggering that there is no TCP/UDP selection or forwarding IP address; this is because the application/game automatically triggers the necessary TCP/UDP Ports and forwards them to the requesting device IP on your LAN as requests are sent to the Router.

 

Again, it's easier to use Port Range Forwarding or Triggering instead of Single Port Forwarding. In those cases where there isn't a range but only a single port listed, your range is the same port, e.g., Range 5223-5223 for Port 5223. Port Triggering is also preferable to Port Forwarding, since Triggering relies on the game or application in question to trigger the Port request when necessary to the Router. Static Port Forwarding setups keep your Ports open as long as they are enabled in the Router setting, and as such are more vulnerable. Trigger Ports are only open as long as the game or application needs them to be open.

 

Note: I'm currently using a Linksys E4200 Dual-Band N Router with a Linksys WES610N Bridge/External Adapter (connected to my PS3's Ethernet to get N speeds) for my network. The following screen shots are of my older Linksys E3000 Router, and are shown here as setup examples; not all ports shown are for BF3. The E4200 and E3000 Admin screens are virtually identical, save for some advanced routing settings. Some Port settings are from older games; I've just been too lazy to remove them. Your own setup might require different settings. On the Port Range Forwarding example, those Enabled boxes that aren't checked are for games/ports I'm not currently using right now, and haven't removed.

 

PORT RANGE TRIGGERING

 

PRT.JPG

 

 

 

PORT RANGE FORWARDING

 

PRF.JPG

 

 

 

QUALITY OF SERVICE (QoS)

 

QOS.JPG

 

 

WIRELESS SETUP EXAMPLE

 

Note that the SSID's used are for examples only - I of course use different SSID's. Whatever you use, make sure that it's unique enough for you to know that it's yours. While you can of course broadcast without broadcasting your SSID (Radio only, no ID) it can be a pain if your signal drops for any reason (even a power grid cycle in your area), and you might have to reconnect manually.

 

It's important that you always change your SSID from the default to a unique name, especially if you're in close proximity to other Routers (e.g., apartment complex). You'd be surprised at how many people don't change it, and inadvertently connect to a different neighboring Router.

 

 

wireless.JPG

 

Most people also don't realize that Wireless Adapters (external, USB, internal, etc.) usually have their own setup parameters that can be adjusted manually. Don't assume that just by plugging it in and connecting it that you're going to get the optimum connection speed. Make sure you adjust your adapter's settings to match your Router's wireless settings.

 

 

WIRELESS SECURITY

 

I personally only use WPA2/WPA Mixed Mode encryption on my 2.4ghz band, not on the 5ghz band where I stream gaming data. Early on when the Draft-N Routers first came out, there was a real problem with wireless encryption interrupting game data flow. With newer Routers it likely isn't an issue, but I'm not convinced that they ever solved the problem.

 

This doesn't mean I'm totally security-free on my 5ghz band; I've used the Router's MAC Address Filtering capability for years. MAC Filtering allows you to add a list of wireless clients (networked hardware) to the filter, and when set, it will only allow those devices to connect to your network. Anyone attempting to connect to your network to steal bandwidth (or worse) will get an error, or it'll just keep trying to connect without any success. I also have a secondary network lock password (using Network Magic) so I've got an added layer of protection.

 

A word of caution; Linksys Routers have both Prevent and Permit Devices selections for the MAC filter. For some incredibly stupid reason, if you Enable the filter, Prevent is the default selection. MAKE SURE before you save your settings if you use MAC Filtering that it's set to Permit and not Prevent, or you'll wind up having to do a hard reset on your Router to re-establish a connection with it.

 

 

PS3 SETUP

 

The biggest problem with getting the speed advantage out of a Dual-Band N Router with your PS3 is that you need a comparable external Dual-Band N wireless adapter to connect to your PS3. The PS3's internal wireless adapter is Wireless G, meaning it can only attain a top speed of 54mbps, so even if you've got a Router that has a rated wireless speed that's much higher, the connection will only run at 54mbps. Always remember that network connections are dictated by the slowest device, not the fastest. That's why virtually all my own network devices are Wireless N.

 

To get the speed out of a Dual-Band N Router, you connect a DBN Wireless Adapter (e.g., Linksys WES610N) to the Ethernet Port on your PS3, then select Wired for the connection in the PS3's Network setup. This bypasses the PS3's internal Wireless G adapter, and connects it directly to the external Dual-Band N adapter, allowing for Wireless N connection speeds between your PS3 and Router.

 

 

NETWORK SPEED

 

It's important to understand that you can only control the internal LAN within your home; once your connection exits your house, you're pretty much at the mercy of your ISP's internet connectivity and the multiple servers in-between your LAN and the gaming server. In other words, don't expect tin can/wire internet service to give you superior gaming performance.

 

Note that in any Network setup where mixed network devices are used (say a PS3's Wireless G adapter on an N network) you will see speed slowdowns on the network. However, if you're using an N network and seeing G speeds of 54mbps, don't automatically assume that the Router is connecting at G speeds - it isn't. It just appears that way due to that particular speed number, but the fact is that something has slowed the transmission down to that rate. There are more things that affect speed than I can cover in this post, but interference (RFI, EMI), Internet traffic congestion during peak times, even a single setting mismatch between your Router and Network Adapter, can spell the difference between hi-speed N and being a candidate for being on a commercial with Bill & Caroline Slowsky.

 

One problem many people have, especially if their street internet terminal is a good distance from their house, is a weak signal. Weak incoming signal can be compounded by additional networked broadband devices (e.g., multiple cable boxes), which further drop the signal strength. Think of the signal as voltage, and each network device as a resistor that lowers the overall signal across the network.

 

To help overcome this, you can add a signal line booster to your cable line (I've used one myself for 12 years). You can Google them; Motorola has a good one for about $40. Always get one that's AC powered, not one that's just an inline transformer, as they're just a waste of money.

 

Don't forget about the lag time between your console and your TV, particularly if you're still using an older model CRT or HD system. Most newer model HDTV's have installed gaming circuits that specifically eliminate the video lag between the console and the TV, which can be up to 100ms (anyone who's ever played Guitar Hero and used the lag adjustment feature knows this problem). 100ms is enough to get reamed in Battlefield.

 

One thing I've learned over the years of dealing with networks is that if you start experiencing slowdowns/interruptions, reset your Modem and Router (unplug for 30 seconds, plug in Modem first, then Router). If your network gets a lot of use, you should reset/reboot it at least once a week anyway. If that doesn't do it, re-flash the Router firmware (make SURE you save the configuration in the Admin panel first, just in case) with the current firmware update, even if the current version is installed. Flashing the firmware is standard procedure for Router manufacturers, and it's the first thing they'll tell you to do if you call their support line and you're experiencing slowdowns and signal drops.

 

 

Network Speed & Environmental Interference

 

Wireless connections are affected by local environmental conditions in the home - building structure, other electronic devices on the same frequency (e.g., cordless phones using 2.4ghz or 5ghz bands), microwave ovens, etc. Most electronic devices are supposed to be built to Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) standards to limit external interference, but the reality is that many aren't. I've dealt with many support cases where cordless phones have literally dropped an internet connection; in one case, a customer noticed and verified that every time his neigbor's phone rang, his 'net connection dropped (it was in an apartment building). The neighbor got a new phone, and the problem went away.

 

The material your apartment building/home is constructed of can interfere with wireless connections as well. In my own case, my house was built in the 50's, and the walls are extremely thick (1/4" drywall, with metal latte screen and 1/2" of plaster on top of it). The metal latte screen causes signal problems, so I've had to adjust the position of my Router and Modem to get optimum signal. If you're limited in where you can put your Modem and Router, you can use a wireless Range Extender. For anyone that has to use a microcell in their home due to limited connectivity in their area with a local cell tower (not uncommon in hilly or mountainous areas) Range Extenders perform the same function, just within the confines of the LAN.

 

 

ROUTER WIRELESS SETUP

 

As I've mentioned, a single incorrect setting on your Router's wireless setup can mean the difference between optimum signal and garbage. If you're still using Wireless G devices in the home (examples are iPads, iPhones, 'Droid devices, older network adapters) then a Dual-Band N Router for gaming helps you get around dealing with those slower devices. Set up your 2.4ghz network band to handle Mixed wireless devices (i.e., A,B,G, and N), and set your 5ghz band to handle Wireless N-only devices (i.e., external adapter for your PS3, PC's/Notebooks with N adapters, etc.).

 

 

A Note About Wireless Adapter Setup

 

Most people don't realize that Wireless Adapters (external, USB, internal, etc.) usually have their own setup parameters that can be adjusted manually. Don't assume that just by plugging it in and connecting it that you're going to get the optimum connection speed. Make sure you adjust your adapter's settings to match your Router's wireless settings whenever possible.

 

 

PROTECTING YOUR ELECTRONICS

 

If you live in an area where incoming line voltage fluctuations are a problem, or you experience power cycles/outages, you should consider getting a Backup UPS with Automatic Voltage Regulation (AVR) capability. Poor incoming voltage to your network devices can affect overall performance, i.e., your gaming performance. A UPS with a Voltage Regulator will maintain a constant, clean input voltage to your network/PS3/TV regardless of the incoming street voltage from your power company, as well as protect it. Many newer UPS systems have VR capability, but check to make sure, as not all do. I use both Tripplite and APC units for all of my key electronics, including HDTV's, PC's, PS3,Modem, Router, etc. This means when the power goes out or cycles for short periods, it doesn't affect my gameplay.

 

 

HEADSETS

 

While not a network speed item, a good headset is essential for team play online in Battlefield, not just for communication between team/squad members, but to hear what's happening around them. You just can't appreciate how much more detailed sound that's critical to gameplay that you can hear unless you're using a headset that's Dolby/Surround capable. Sony just came out with a pretty decent PS3 wireless headset that uses virtual surround, and it's a lot more comfortable than my own Turtle Beach DPX21. However, comparing them, I prefer the TB's, even though they're not as comfortable on the ears over long hours of gameplay. They just have more sound setting options which are more easily accessible. 

 

My point is don't complain about getting owned in Battlefield when you're not listening or communicating with others in-game who are, or if you're using a poor quality headset that fails to give you the full range of sound that lets you hear some noob trying to sneak up on you for a knife kill.

 

 

PS3 CONTROLLERS

 

Always be aware of your PS3 controller's battery level. The controller is Bluetooth, which is simply a shortwave radio connection between it and the PS3. Again, a weaker signal caused by a low power (battery) level can increase your lag time in-game. Keep it charged, or switch if you've got 2. I usually plug mine in around the 50% level.

 

 

SUMMARY

 

While it's much easier to blame DICE, EA, Battlefield 3, or the gaming server on poor performance and gaming experience, the reality is that most players who have gaming problems (freezes, drops, lag, etc.), have only the person in the mirror to blame (or if you're living at home, your parents) for not ensuring they're network is running at optimum speed and configuration for gaming. While you can't control what happens after your signal leaves your home, everything you can do to improve your LAN performance goes toward your better overall gaming performance. All you need to do is to make the decision to learn how, and get it done.

 

Analyze your network and your environment, and make changes where possible if you can.

 

RAVEN


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

Former Sony G.A.P. Member
Linksys Dual-Band N Network
MOH, RDR, KILLZONE 2/3, COD 4/5,MW2, B'Ops, Battlefield 1943, BFBC2, BATTLEFIELD 3, BLACK OPS 2:

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Dec 31, 2011

Wow.  You, sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.


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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Dec 31, 2011

There's just one major thing you missed, 1000BASE-T.  Which is up to ~700Mb/s faster than Wireless-N.  If someone has the option to use wired, the only thing they need is compatible hardware (i.e. PS3, switches, routers).  Plus, it doesn't matter that EMR travels at the speed of light, it only matters what the hardware is capable of; meaning wired 1000BASE-T is still faster.  With wireless, packets will still be lost more often than wired.

Also, is the PS3 actually vulnerable to attacks ?

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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Jan 18, 2012

A DMZ opens all your ports - while that might not seem like a big deal to some, what it does is open your Router to constant probing attacks, which ultimately slow your connection, not to mention the inherent security problems with open ports.

As far as gigabit Ethernet goes, remember I'm only speaking to home LAN's and what most users have access to, not professional gamers. And regardless, wireless will always be faster than wired connections depending on the communication standards involoved. Wired connections are more stable and subject to less signal fluctuation (assuming a clean power signal at the outlet) and environmental issues than wireless signals are. But Wireless N Routers for home users are 3-4 times faster than the Ethernet most gamers have access to.


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

Former Sony G.A.P. Member
Linksys Dual-Band N Network
MOH, RDR, KILLZONE 2/3, COD 4/5,MW2, B'Ops, Battlefield 1943, BFBC2, BATTLEFIELD 3, BLACK OPS 2:

TSD_-RAVEN-

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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Jan 19, 2012

I understand that, but I see it as if you can go wired, pay the extra ~$5 for gigabit rather than cluttering your air space.  And most−if not all−routers that have 802.11n would have GigE too.  Once 802.11ac becomes more mainstream, that's a whole other story (theoretical maximum throughput of 6.93Gb/s).

Also, if your feeling really ambitious, flash your router with DD-WRT / OpenWRT for greater control/customizability.

I guess my views of home LANs may be askew.

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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Feb 28, 2012

Again, don't confuse throughput capability (e.g., Gigabit) with actual throughput availability; Ethernet for home LAN's runs at 100mbps. As far as wireless, the new AC standard (500mbps for on the 5ghz band), is at least 4-5 years from widespread use; I had one of the first Draft Dual-Band N Routers when they first hit the street in 2006, and it took 4 years to ratify the standard. The newer DBN Routers since they ratified the standard are easily twice as fast as the draft versions, and the wireless capability is more powerful and a lot smoother. This is due largely to the increase in popularity of on-demand internet video content like Netflix, Hulu, etc., requring higher speed video streaming.

The current Linksys E4200 (which I use) is rated and independently tested at 450mbps on the 5ghz band; problem is, there isn't currently a DBN adapter with the same throughput speed, the top speed for most being 300mbps. Even then, the average gamer  isn't willing or able to shell out the extra $$ required for updated hardware, let alone pay for business-class Internet connections to their home. I can justify it (for both business and gaming) but of course most people can't. However, in many cases where freezes, disconnects, or game lag is an issue, proper Router setup and a faster internal LAN connection will solve most of it. Of course we can't control EA or DICE's issues, or the local ISP, but the point is you do what you can to improve your gaming stream speed wherever you can, so that you can gain an edge while gaming.

As far as airspace "clutter", with a good DBN Router like the E3000 or E4200, using 2 separate network bands for different network devices, this just isn't an issue. As I said in my OP, I run important stuff (i.e., business and gaming streams) over my 5ghz network band; everything else goes over the 2.4ghz band, with Quality of Service settings set to give my PS3, Adapter, and all game Ports priority access to the Router. At any given time though, I have between 5-9 wireless devices connected to my Router, and it just doesn't affect my gameplay.

And no offfense dude, but judging by your own BF3 stats, you should rethink your position on wired/wireless connections.


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Feb 29, 2012

TSD_-RAVEN- wrote:

Again, don't confuse throughput capability (e.g., Gigabit) with actual throughput availability; Ethernet for home LAN's runs at 100mbps. No, just no. As far as wireless, the new AC standard (500mbps for on the 5ghz band), is at least 4-5 years from widespread use; I had one of the first Draft Dual-Band N Routers when they first hit the street in 2006, and it took 4 years to ratify the standard. OK  The newer DBN Routers since they ratified the standard are easily twice as fast as the draft versions, and the wireless capability is more powerful and a lot smoother. I would agree  This is due largely to the increase in popularity of on-demand internet video content like Netflix, Hulu, etc., requiring higher speed video streaming. OK

The current Linksys E4200 (which I use) is rated and independently tested at 450mbps on the 5ghz band; problem is, there isn't currently a DBN adapter with the same throughput speed, the top speed for most being 300mbps. Almost Incorrect;they're all >300Mb/s  Even then, the average gamer  isn't willing or able to shell out the extra $$ required for updated hardware, Maybe not everyone, but if you have XBMC (or similar) and don't subscribe to cable then you want the highest throughputs to stream let alone pay for business-class Internet connections to their home. Sometimes business-class is cheaper for certain individuals  I can justify it (for both business and gaming) but of course most people can't. However, in many cases where freezes, disconnects, or game lag is an issue, proper Router setup and a faster internal LAN connection will solve most of it. I agree  Of course we can't control EA or DICE's issues, or the local ISP, but the point is you do what you can to improve your gaming stream speed wherever you can, so that you can gain an edge while gaming.

As far as airspace "clutter", with a good DBN Router like the E3000 or E4200, using 2 separate network bands for different network devices, this just isn't an issue. As I said in my OP, I run important stuff (i.e., business and gaming streams) over my 5ghz network band; everything else goes over the 2.4ghz band, with Quality of Service settings set to give my PS3, Adapter, and all game Ports priority access to the Router. At any given time though, I have between 5-9 wireless devices connected to my Router, and it just doesn't affect my gameplay. I meant the "clutter" concerns apartment dwellers the most.  But yes, the 5GHz band does alleviate the "clutter"

And no offense dude, but judging by your own BF3 stats, you should rethink your position on wired/wireless connections. Honestly, what do you mean by that? I don't know...


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

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Do you know the max wireless throughput for the PS3?

P.S. Since I haven't said it yet, your original post really was helpful and I learned something new!  Also, when I commented about the gigabit, I was only trying to improve your guide and prevent others from being misinformed.

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Feb 29, 2012

No sweat, I'm just being a smartass as usual.

The PS3's internal wireless adapter is still a Wireless G, so it's max throughput is only 54mbps.  That's why a lot of people still think Ethernet is faster for the PS3; it was several years ago when it came out, but when the external N adapters came out along with Dual-Band N Routers, you could get much faster speeds with wireless than you ever could with Ethernet. As an example, one of my clan buddies recently listened to me and got essentially the same setup as I have, and set it up per my instructions. Before, his BF3 stats were about average and he was getting game freezes regularly. Now he's kicking ass and he hasn't experienced the lag/freeze issues he was having before. If you look at his stats graph, his KD and SPM have been steadily climbing ever since. Same with another friend, though he just did the Port setups on his existing N Router. He's now winning 1 on 1's that he wasn't before.

If you're stuck with a Wireless G Router, or a Wireless N Router without an external N adapter for your PS3, then you're better off using the PS3's Ethernet connection. But when you're connected and humming at 300mbps to your Router, it's a big difference in the game that's noticeable, especially if you play a lot.

I expect that by the time Sony comes out with a PS4, it'll have an N adapter, and the world will have moved on to Wireless AC.


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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Mar 1, 2012

Oh yeah, I don't know why I didn't connect the dots with G and the PS3.  I know what mean now by the stats.  It makes sense. 

It does suck being stuck with 802.11g when there's a perfectly good Draft 802.11n (D-Link DIR-655) router waiting for U-Verse's gateway to leave.  (Haven't figured out how to setup the network so its WWW --> AT&T Gateway --> N-Router --> LAN)  Plus the DIR-655 has gigabit ethernet for when I'm streaming shows from the PC to the TV.

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR BATTLEFIELD 3, PS3 & PLAYSTATION NETWORK

Mar 1, 2012

Your network problem is the primary reason I don't get services that force you to use their own equipment.

Remember, like I said before, "GIgabit Ethernet" is essentially a marketing ploy; you'll never attain that theoretical throughput speed in real-world application, but it sounds and looks great on the box. I compare it to the term "Cable Ready" years ago when VCR's and TV's first came out; many people thought that the term meant that they wouldn't need a cable box, but in reality all it meant was that the device had a coax cable input.

The best (at least currently) wireless speed you can really hope to achieve is 300mbps. But any increase in speed can mean

the difference between kicking ass or getting your ass kicked.

Here's a good HP article I've referenced over the years when explaining throughput speeds that'll help you understand better:

Understanding Throughput on the 1GB Ethernet

As far as your own particular setup, here's a link to a procedure on how to setup a U-verse with a Router; make sure you check the links at the bottom.

A Guide to Use your own wireless router with AT&T U-Verse's Residential Gateway

Keep in mind though that you'd still need an external N adapter for your PS3 to connect at N speeds to the Router.


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Former Sony G.A.P. Member
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MOH, RDR, KILLZONE 2/3, COD 4/5,MW2, B'Ops, Battlefield 1943, BFBC2, BATTLEFIELD 3, BLACK OPS 2:

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