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Treasure Hunter
Registered: 01/11/2009
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 18, 2010

 


PapaWarlock wrote:

 


godsgift1888 wrote:
i have a furthering question to this topic would sexuality in videos games put you off buying a game you were a fan of

 

It would depend on how it was done. The God of War series is well known for it's Sex-Mini game which rewards you with a good amount of red orbs (experience points) and repeated efforts do not get rewarded. I know BioWare's games this generation are filled with "dating" mini games. Eventually leading to a rather suggestive (but censored) cut scene where the two characters remove most of their clothing, a bit of kissing and then "the morning after".

 

That doesn't bother me and likely wouldn't bother me if it was a full blown sexual encounter. But as I mentioned, it depends on how it's done. If done as part of the story line, a one time deal basically each play through, it wouldn't really bother me. After all it is a part of life. But if it was excessive then I would likely not get the game. By this I mean picking up hookers on the corner, teammates, or storyline girlfriends and engaging in sex any time you wanted, then I would not get the game, even if I was a fan of the series. 

 

But that is only a personal choice. I don't say that because I find the topic offensive, but just because it's not what I want in my games.


 

See i can agree it does depend on how it is done and relative to genre series and the companys past work but it does come to public perception aswell and games being politically correct 

 

But i think the best way to go would be the likes of doublefine with brutal legend and they let you beep it out so i think if their gonna show it within a game if you feel that it is not in your nature then at the start you can select to block it out i.e the cutscenes etc  so there are ways but i think games and sexuality etc all really comes down to the ESRB ratings and games being politically correct 

 

but as long as theres something there to protect because for talking sake the ratchet and clank series  if we got some form of sexual scene in a trailer for an upcoming title and its something we dont expect of the series i would agree its how it is done if they gave the option to block then it can work anyways buddeh thanks for the reply appreciated and sorry for derailing the thread there

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Fender Bender
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 20, 2010
I am not necessarily wanting it in my games. God of War 3 was pretty much soft core **bleep**. I will admit that if it it is there for a reason I am okay with it. MGS didn't show many sexual things except for the way the women were. I wish they didn't over do women in the video games. I really was glad that in Uncharted they didn't over do Elena.

There needs to be a purpose for the sexuality. But I think that it can be done tastefully in games. MGS3 did it pretty good. If it is just a sex mini game then I don't like it being there.
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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 22, 2010

 


PapaWarlock wrote:

 


godsgift1888 wrote:
i have a furthering question to this topic would sexuality in videos games put you off buying a game you were a fan of

 

It would depend on how it was done. The God of War series is well known for it's Sex-Mini game which rewards you with a good amount of red orbs (experience points) and repeated efforts do not get rewarded. I know BioWare's games this generation are filled with "dating" mini games. Eventually leading to a rather suggestive (but censored) cut scene where the two characters remove most of their clothing, a bit of kissing and then "the morning after".

 

That doesn't bother me and likely wouldn't bother me if it was a full blown sexual encounter. But as I mentioned, it depends on how it's done. If done as part of the story line, a one time deal basically each play through, it wouldn't really bother me. After all it is a part of life. But if it was excessive then I would likely not get the game. By this I mean picking up hookers on the corner, teammates, or storyline girlfriends and engaging in sex any time you wanted, then I would not get the game, even if I was a fan of the series. 

 

But that is only a personal choice. I don't say that because I find the topic offensive, but just because it's not what I want in my games.


Not a Grand Theft Auto 4 fan? 

 

 

As PapaWarlock stated, sex is a part of life. I dare say, if it wasn't for sex, we all wouldn't be here posting. But, there is a limit. My limit is not as restrictive as PapaWarlock's either. I found sexual encounters and dating in GTA 4 to be acceptable. The mini-games in God of War? Not so much.

 

You see, Kratos didn't need a sexual encounter to move the game's story along. As a matter of fact, the fact that Kratos will stop from his quest of revenge which all starts with the death of his wife, makes it not fit AT ALL. 

 

In GTA 4 however, Niko Bellic comes to the United States for the first time. Liberty City is a fictional version of New York and it's spot on as far as I'm concerned. It fits. It makes sense. And had Niko been a real person coming to New York for the first time, he may have been attracted or repulsed by the same things as you when you made those choices in game.

 

I think it's clear when something is thrown in just to be over the top to make players past puberty go "COOL!"

 

Here's another good point of comparison.

 

You know how I feel about God of War's sex mini game right? Well, God of War's doppelganger in  Dante's Inferno has an entire section dedicated to a circle of hell called, "Lust". The use of sex related imagery and graphics was REALLY over the top when viewed on it's own. I obviously can't describe it on here. But, not once did I feel they were trying to impress me with how far they're willing to go with sexuality in their game. Instead, I appreciated it as art. Though it was certainly not subtle, it certainly fit the story. As a matter of fact, now that I think about it, Dante's Inferno is the first time I saw a fully nude male in a game, and I didn't even realize that till now (almost a month after I beat it)

 

I guess this whole long post boils down to one sentence: "Do it, but in good taste."

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 23, 2010

I appreciate your courage to bring up this controversial issue, Random Hero. I was reading about this issue the other day in my October issue of Game Informer.

 

As with many others, I believe that sexuality in video games should be present but regulated. Sexuality is a necessary part of human nature and many video games try to portray this in a favorable or unfavorable light. Like many others, I view sexuality and sexual acts are something that shouldn't be easily accessed or frequently shown. I believe that sex is a sacrosanct act and that it should be treated as such. However, I am always in favor of pushing the envelope for art's sake. I enjoy things that are thrown into media that may make some with close minded beliefs shocked. I view media and games especially as throwing a monkey wrench into the close-minded and allowing them to see that videogames are more than entertainment.

 

You bring up the instance of Heavy Rain. I believe that sexual act was art for art's sake. It wasn't extremely random or shallow like Grand Theft Auto's Hot Coffee mod, the initiation of a sexual act advanced the story and thus advanced art. I do not believe that the Hot Coffee mod advanced art in any way, shape, or form due to the nature of the sexual act. I am all for sexuality in games, it's just how it's portrayed and to who that bothers me. If we want outsiders to view videogames as more than just entertainment, we must stop this lewdness in videogames - portraying sexuality and sexual acts just because we wish to satisfy our id (or basic desires). There is a point to where sexuality becomes **bleep**ography and I do not wish for my beloved videogames to be subjected to such trash on a daily basis. There is already a high level of censorship in games, but still, politicians manage to pick and pick and pick and pick and pick.

 

For any politician, schoolteacher, or concerned parent, even a little is too much. Anything to throw a harpoon through videogames, they will do it. They believe that videogames are low culture and that they cater to the baser population. These people do not recognized videogames as art, only as scapegoats and another reason why the 21st century modern day society is the way it is. If we wish for videogames to stand up and be counted as a significant contribution to human civilization, we must not accept the borderline **bleep**ography we see on our videogames year after year.

 

This already such a significant issue that it is going to the Supreme Court. The state of California may be able to decide what ratings to give games! What kind of lunacy is that? Government should have no intervention in videogames. Vidoegames are another expression of speech, government should not intervene.

 

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 25, 2010

I don't mind it myself, unless it really isn't overdone. If the scene is in good taste, like art, sure, but if it is a scene asking for the immature to buy it for that sole reason, just to be used as **bleep**, I don't want it. Catherine, on that note, interests me. Sure, it seems sexual, but it has my interest because it LOOKS interesting all around. The graphics look interesting, the story looks interesting, the genre Atlus is trying to create and put out is interesting.... Sexual tones are fine by me, but onscreen action will be another issue. The game isn't even rated M, so it shouldn't be so bad.

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Fender Bender
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 27, 2010
What the heck is up with Ghost of Sparta!?!?
http://www.gametrailers.com/video/brothel-fail-god-of-war/706624#
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I don't play God Of War, button mashing, freakishly angry main character, over abundance of sex games.
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Fender Bender
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Oct 28, 2010

It seems to me if sexuality has found its place in video games its because the developers have run out original unique ideas to keep the masses interested.  **bleep** is a billion dollar empire and the media outlets know Sex Sales.  However I think it cheapens the game and all the hard work that was put in to the developement.

 

Whats next Wet T-shirt contests at the E3 and Comic Con to boost more attention?

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Nov 1, 2010

Although Catherine is an Action-Adventure game, since it’s being produced by the noted RPG publisher Atlus I will naturally be taking a close interest in this title if it gets released in North America. But whether it will be released or not is anyone’s guess at this point. On the one hand I could point out that Atlus is known for making RPGs, not Eroge. On the other hand, this game seems to have received a C rating by Japan’s Computer Entertainment Rating Organization (CERO), and it would be naïve to assume that that automatically translates to a T rating by North America’s Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB), because what the CERO considers suitable content for a 15 year old Japanese youth may not equate with what the ESRB considers suitable content for a 13 year old North American child. The ESRB could just as easily give the game an M rating as a T rating, and from what I’ve seen thus far (cheese pizza anyone?) most likely will give it an M rating.

 

Is this fair? Well, yes. North America is not Japan. However, I don’t think the issue is simply that of videogames being considered “children’s games.” Although our culture has changed tremendously since the “Sexual Revolution” of the 1960s, compared to other societies - especially those of France and Japan for example - Americans are still rather puritanical with regards to sexuality. Issues that impact upon children are especially sensitive, yes, but there’s also a wide range of adult sexual issues that simply never get addressed, or even acknowledged, in our culture.

 

As to where I think we’re heading in the future, or where I think we should be heading, I would say that I would definitely like to see the development of games geared more towards “adults,” and I’m not necessarily referring to sexual content (although that is a part of it). In the RPG forum, it’s long been recognized that RPGs really need to move beyond the stereotypical “band of teenagers out to save the world,” so for that reason alone, I have to applaud Atlus for pushing the boundary in terms of game development.

 

In my view however, the real issue has less to do with specific content and more to do with age appropriate game restrictions. For example, despite its commercial success and critical acclaim from gaming sites, GTA: San Andreas, like all of the other GTA games, was not taken seriously by the wider (non-gaming) North American culture. With its cop-killing, drug-running, car-stealing game play, it was considered to be a game that appealed to adolescents. Therefore the “Hot Coffee” scandal was seen as yet another example of Rockstar thumbing its nose at the non-gaming community while trying to titillate adolescent gamers. And lets face it, leaving that code in the published game was either unbelievably stupid, deliberately calculated, or both, because anyone with the least amount of knowledge of how PC games are modded knows that that code was going to be discovered and patched the moment the game was released. This is why, until they released Red Dead Redemption, Rockstar used to be the company I loved to hate.

 

On the other hand, Heavy Rain was seen as a serious and mature game that appealed to adults, so any sexual content was evaluated in that context. This isn’t a double standard. Games targeted towards children are necessarily going to be evaluated under different standards from those targeted towards adults – and this is how it should be. So, to answer your question more directly, I don’t have a problem with “scantily-clad anime maidens” or even “passionate lovemaking scene”, as long as the games are rated appropriately and kept out of the hands of children.

 

As I’ve grown older, I’ve become more and more uncomfortable with any attempt to limit freedom of speech. As Evelyn Beatrice Hall stated, “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” And since I consider video games to be works of art; it follows that I’m opposed on principle to any attempt to censor videogame content. That said, I recognize that it does take a certain amount of maturity to deal with certain types of content, which is why I feel that having age-appropriate ratings – and more importantly, enforcing them in a credible manner – is the key to the future growth of the videogame market.

 

To give one example, I’ve never really cared for FPSs myself, but I’ve had friends tell me that if it wasn’t for FPSs they’d be in prison – meaning, I suppose, that the games acted as a cathartic for them. However, using a videogame in this manner takes a certain amount of psychological maturity, which is why age-appropriate ratings are so important. And of course this also requires parents who are involved and informed as to their children’s activities.

 

Similarly, I’m sure most everyone on these forums is aware that there’s entire categories of games produced in Japan that aren’t being localized to North America because of their sexual content. Will this ever change? Well, certainly not in the foreseeable future, but I believe that a dialogue such as this one is a necessary first step towards such change.  We, as gamers, need to be proactive in educating non-gamers, developers, and even lawmakers that we would like to see videogames accepted as a legitimate art form – a story-telling medium no different from books or songs or movies. Once that happens our North American developers will have a freer hand to develop games as they wish, and we won’t have to sit around wondering if a game like Catherine will ever make it to our shores.  

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Nov 5, 2010

no such thing as too much sexuality in video games.  Just put a rated R on the box and let the developers create as much nudity as they want.

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Sackboy
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Re: Sexuality in Video Games: How Much is Too Much?

Dec 30, 2010

The problem with this is areas that 'card' people buying games.  I was at Best Buy yesterday and some poor teenager couldn't buy a game because he wasn't 18.  The ESRB was set at that level so the sales person wouldn't let him buy it.  This poor guy missed out on what could have been a great gaming experience due to content.  Sex just for sex-sake is useless.  I don't think we need T&A in the game to make it a good game.  The Internet's full of pr0n, go surf for some if you need your jollies and let the gamers game!    

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