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MVP Support
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 11, 2010

I'm not clear on which of my points you think that your post is refuting.  None of them, as far as I can tell. Publishers have virtually absolute power to prevent a game from being published on their platform, but they have almost no ability to compel a publisher to distribute a game on a platform that it does not find attractive.  The only method Microsoft has found that works is checks for lots of money made out to the publisher.  Sony offers only small monetary incentives for independent developers that are making PSN Exclusives; and considering how few of those there are, obviously the incentives are not particularly effective. In general it doesn't appear to me that publishers are beating down Sony's door to publish games on the PSP.  The release calendar certainly doesn't reflect much desperation in that area.  If Sony wants the PSP to improve its fortunes this generation; or the PSP successor to fare even as well, let alone better; then the last thing that Sony can afford to do is make the PSP less attractive to develop for. 

 

Sony can't change its license agreements with developers unilaterally to force additional requirements on them, including publishing games in the Playstation Store. It takes about 2 years to develop a major PSP game, and no publisher is going to invest two years worth of development dollars without knowing what the distribution deal is up-front. It's a contract, and neither party can change it without the agreement of the other party. Sony could change future license agreements to require all games to be distributed in the Playstation Store; but doing so would risk that some publishers might abandon the PSP platform (which hasn't been particularly lucrative for many third-party publishers lately anyway), and that those that stayed might publish fewer PSP games. That doesn't help Sony, or PSP owners.  Sony would be insane to risk the success of the entire PSP platform for the benefit of a slow-selling product like the Go.  That just doesn't make business sense. The Go was just an experiment.  Sony isn't going to sacrifice the entire PSP platform in a probably futile attempt to improve PSP Go sales. 

 

The vast majority of FF XI players play on Windows, as is the case with every other MMORPG; and the same will probably be true with FF XIV as well.  I doubt that Square Enix's plans for FF XIV will be affected much regardless of what Microsoft decides about the console version.  The game isn't really a natural fit for the console.

GKP
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MVP Support
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 11, 2010

Good point.  There wasn't much interest in publishing PSP games in the Playstation Store prior to the announcement of the Go.  The fact that Sony called such games UMD Classics probably didn't do much to promote the idea that new releases should be made available in the Playstation Store at the same time as the retail release. Sony's plan for turning the Playstation Store into a major channel for new PSP games was based on the PSP Go; a PSP that could only play games from the Playstation Store, and therefore offered a virtually guaranteed market for Playstation Store games.  And the plan worked.  But only for a couple of months until the retail sales figures for the PSP Go came out.  At that point publishers realized that the guaranteed market for Playstation Store games provided by the PSP Go wasn't big enough to be worth pursuing, and they went back to considering the Playstation Store to be a secondary channel. The rapidly declining publisher support for the Playstation Store made the PSP Go even less attractive, causing its sales to go even lower.  It is at the point now where no amount of free games or other promotions can get the PSP Go out of last place in the handheld race, even for one month. That was no one's fault except Sony's.  The publishers are just doing what makes sense for their business, and Sony never expected them to do anything else.   If the Go had sold over a million units in its first month, instead of less than 30,000; the Playstation Store would have a lot more publisher support today.

 

The PSP Go, and the revitalization of the PSP Playstation Store that it was supposed to drive, both failed for one reason, and one reason alone. The people that were supposed to buy the PSP Go, didn't buy it.  The PSP Go was intended to appeal to people that are currently playing cheap little games that they download from the Internet on their handheld devices.  I assume that there is no need to mention the brand of the devices.  The theory behind the PSP Go is that those people would rather be playing conventional console games; with deep gameplay, precise controls, and high production values. Those games cost more (like 3-4 times more, at least), but the people playing the cheap games appreciate the difference, and think the conventional games are worth it.  The only reason they are playing those cheap little games is because you have to buy the conventional games in a store (online or brick and mortar), and carry them around on disks or cartridges.  That just isn't convenient enough for these people.  If there was a handheld entertainment device that allowed them to purchase conventional games online from any Wi-Fi hot spot, and download the games directly to the device, many of those people would buy that device instead of the one that only plays cheap little games.  If they must have some cheap little games too, Sony can offer those as well (Minis). 

 

Sony stated after the first month's Go sales were announced that only 10% of the people in their focus groups said they were likely to buy a product like the Go, and therefore Sony's expectations for Go sales were limited (in other words, that the Go wasn't a disappointment).  That makes a lot of sense.  The lack of compatibility with UMD games meant that the Go wasn't likely to appeal to many existing PSP owners.  As for the new PSP owners that the Go was supposed to attract, the product plan for the Go made several assumptions about those people.

 

  1. That they prefer conventional video game experiences; instead of the small, simple, games that they are playing now
  2. That they prefer conventional video game experiences enough to spend $250 on a new device
  3. That they prefer conventional video game experiences enough to spend several times more money on new titles, and pay for all of their games, instead of getting many of them for free
  4. That they prefer conventional video game experiences enough to repurchase the DRM-protected video content that they already own for their current device
  5. That they prefer conventional video game experiences enough to carry a larger device in order to play them

 

See a pattern (I tried to make it obvious)?  The PSP Go product plan was almost entirely based on the assumption that the people downloading cheap little games on their handheld devices really want to play PSP games instead, and were willing to spend a considerable amount of money to do so.  The problem is that Sony never had any particular reason to believe that this assumption was in fact true.  It would obviously have been nice for Sony if it was true, but there was no conclusive market research to confirm it.  It was always possible that the people downloading cheap little games to their handhelds just aren't that into video games, were satisfied with what they had; and had no particular desire to invest in a new device to get access to larger, more complex, games.  If that is the case, then the PSP Go would find itself serving a very limited market, which so far is exactly what happened in reality. In retrospect, the poor sales of the PSP Go shouldn't have come as a big surprise to anyone, including Sony.  There was never much reason to think that there was a market for the device in the first place. 

 

PSP Go owners need to face the fact that they are paying participants in a failed market experiment, that was a high-risk concept to begin with.  As for Sony, if it wants the Playstation Store to be a major retail channel for PSP games, it needs to address the reasons why tens of millions of K-series PSPs; all of which are able to download and play games from the Playstation Store, are not a compelling market for publishers to sell Playstation Store games to.  Why were publishers so much more interested in the Playstation Store when Sony offered a download-only PSP?  Why did their interest decline so quickly when the download-only PSP didn't sell well?  Are publishers so convinced that the vast majority of consumers prefer physical media that only publishers that have trouble getting good exposure in stores will ever have much interest in distributing both at retail and in the Playstation Store at the same time; and if so, is there any way to change their minds (or are they correct in that belief)?

GKP
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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 11, 2010

 


soundandvision77 wrote:

gkpama00 wrote:

I was tempted to post my personal mailing address, but that would be against forum rules. There is nothing faulty about your PSP Go.  What was faulty was your assumption that all PSP games released after the Go was available would be in the Playstation Store.  Sony never promised that would be the case; which was wise, because they had no power to keep that promise.  It is up to the publisher of the game to decide whether to offer it for download in the Playstation Store, and when to do so.  Sony has no control over that decision for games that Sony did not publish, which is most of the PSP games. Also, any PSP can download and play games from the Playstation Store.  It isn't a feature of the PSP Go. The PSP Go has the limitation of only being able to play games from the Playstation Store. The PSP-3001 can play PSP games from any store, including the Playstation Store.  Obviously you should have purchased a PSP-3001.  You could have purchased most of your games in the Playstation Store and carried them on tiny Memory Stick Pro Duos, and you still would have had the option of putting a UMD in the drive if you wanted to play a game that wasn't available for download.  The research that you did prior to purchasing your PSP Go must have been faulty if you failed to become aware of that option.  Unfortunately, there is nowhere that you can send yourself for a refund or exchange either.  Your next best option is probably to trade in your PSP Go towards the PSP-3001 and memory stick that you should have purchased in the first place.


One thing I would like to point out that I think a lot of people forget already is that before the PSP Go was released, there weren't very many PSP games on PSN except for the PSN exclusives and PS1 Classics.   This doesn't seem like a PSP Go-bashing thread, but in defense of the Go, it's release has really been a benefit for all PSP owners and future adopters of the PSP platform.  If anything, having all those games up on PSN should also help PSP-3000 sales because of the option to buy game both on UMD and digitally.  It's a lot easier to get classic PSP games from PSN rather than searching for used discs.


My intentions aren't to "bash" the PSPgo exactly..  It's by far my favorite PSP I've owned.  It's just unfortunate that the digital download content isn't there (KH:BBS as the main example, I'm sure there's many other games).  It just annoys me that after a year of it's release, digital content is withheld by developers, even though the price of the game remains the same as a UMD.  Sony charges so much per GB to the developers, and I guess Disney has this....fear I guess, since they're the ones who said no to DDs.

 

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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 13, 2010
@gkpama00,

 

Very good post.  I think you've really figured out the idea behind the Go and why it isn't working.  I think I like the system so much because I fit almost all of the assumptions you listed to a tee.  I was playing portable games on the other smaller device and got frustrated with the watered down console-style games like Resident Evil 4 and Hero of Sparta.   The PSP Go was announced, and I was very interested right away.

 

The only things I don't care about are purchasing video content (I never buy TV shows or movies for the PSP or PS3) - the device for me is strictly for games and occasionally watching free videos like trailers, Pulse, and the Tester.  I might buy into the digital comic service as well, but they don't offer it in Canada (yet, hopefully).  Also, the size factor you mentioned - I saw the PSP Go as not much bigger than my other handheld device, and considerably smaller than the PSP-3000, which was one of the reasons I never bought a PSP before even though I was tempted by some of the games.  I really like that the Go could be mistaken for a smartphone with a slide-out keyboard, so people on the train don't gawk at me for playing games.  At this point I don't care anymore though.  Whenever I see someone else on the train playing any gaming device I think its cool.

 

I think your post basically can be summed up that Sony assumed that people who were playing cheap little games on their other device would rather play conventional games.  If Sony thought that was the case, then why wouldn't those people have bought PSPs in the first place before the Go even came out?  Maybe people just didn't realize they wanted handheld games, until they were readily available on their phones.  Sony could have just pushed their marketing of the PSP-3000 towards this new market of handheld gamers, but just pointing out the richer experience available on PSP.   They could have put the old games up on PSN anyway and not even made a new device (especially since they didn't market the Go enough to get people into it).

 

Regardless of what happened, I'm very happy with my PSP Go and will most likely buy a PSP 2 whenever it happens.  I think Sony should put more effort into keeping both physical and digital media going (and comparable to each other) for the the next generation of PSP, and hopefully it will reach a larger base and meet all gamers' needs.

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MVP Support
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010

I think that the Marcus campaign, which does not feature the Go prominently; is trying to do what you suggest.  Sony realizes now that their growth strategy is based on the assumption that a significant number of the gamers on other handheld devices would be interested in a richer gaming experience, and that Sony had never really made a concerted effort to sell the K-Series PSP to that market, before deciding that a new device was needed.  Now Sony is trying to sell the PSP as a platform to the same market that the Go was aimed at, but this time without emphasizing the digital downloads.  The target market is already sold on digital downloads, so there was no reason to generate needless UMD vs. DD controversy to sell to that market.  Sony is also focusing on the games this time, instead of the form-factor of the Go; which as you said is a plus for some potential buyers, but not compelling to very many people by itself. It looks like Sony is learning useful lessons from its experience with the PSP Go, which is good news for all PSP owners.

GKP
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010

 


Freestylin wrote:

I had been under the impression that when I pay double the price for a product that's used for playing the same PSP games as it's earlier models, that I'd be receiving a product that perhaps had an "edge" over the rest.  Unfortunately, that's not the case.  I purchased a PSPgo for the sole purpose of gaming without the use of UMDs, as carrying a mess of cases wasn't practical.  But with major titles like Kingdom Hearts Birth by Sleep not being available for Digital Download, I feel ripped off.  I don't understand why a game built for the PSP system cannot be purchased or played on the PSPgo.

 

Please tell me where to ship my PSPgo to receive my refund, or send me a PSP with a 16GB Memory Card as compensation for purchasing a faulty product.


unless you bought it a short while back, theres nothing you can do , at all stores you have 90 days for a full refund.

 

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010
That's why the PSP Go sucks. I did my research back in January 2010 and got the 3000 model because I KNEW it wouldn't be supported all the way.
Check out my PlayStation dedicated blog, PlayStation Persuasion!

http://playstationpersuasion.tumblr.com/

PSN: ScreamAimFire999 [PS4, PS3, PS Vita Owner]
Twitter: @PSPersuasion

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010

gkpama00 wrote:

I think that the Marcus campaign, which does not feature the Go prominently; is trying to do what you suggest.  Sony realizes now that their growth strategy is based on the assumption that a significant number of the gamers on other handheld devices would be interested in a richer gaming experience, and that Sony had never really made a concerted effort to sell the K-Series PSP to that market, before deciding that a new device was needed.  Now Sony is trying to sell the PSP as a platform to the same market that the Go was aimed at, but this time without emphasizing the digital downloads.  The target market is already sold on digital downloads, so there was no reason to generate needless UMD vs. DD controversy to sell to that market.  Sony is also focusing on the games this time, instead of the form-factor of the Go; which as you said is a plus for some potential buyers, but not compelling to very many people by itself. It looks like Sony is learning useful lessons from its experience with the PSP Go, which is good news for all PSP owners.


Yep, I think you're right.  The whole, "Step your game up" slogan says it all.  The only problem is that the commercials are funny for existing PSP owners, but slightly annoying for everyone else.  If they bash the phone games that so many people like, they might not want to get into the PSP after that.  But since Marcus is young, I think they might be able to attract younger gamers that way, who might still find the commercials funny. 

 

Good point with the UMD vs DD as well - if someone starts looking into upgrading to a PSP, they will find out for themselves that both physical and digital media options are available for buying games.  All they need to do is focus on marketing the PSP platform as a whole.  Hopefully a solid year or so of promoting the current PSP brand will successfully lead into a launch of its successor.

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010

 


Grinchy wrote:

I'm going to get on a Wal-Mart forum and complain about the bad grapes I just bought.  That'll get me my refund.


now THIS is trolling.  way to add something to the discussion, since 2003.

 


~Fighting the Good Fight~
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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Would like a refund on my PSPgo

Sep 14, 2010

 


Freestylin wrote:

 


soundandvision77 wrote:

gkpama00 wrote:

I was tempted to post my personal mailing address, but that would be against forum rules. There is nothing faulty about your PSP Go.  What was faulty was your assumption that all PSP games released after the Go was available would be in the Playstation Store.  Sony never promised that would be the case; which was wise, because they had no power to keep that promise.  It is up to the publisher of the game to decide whether to offer it for download in the Playstation Store, and when to do so.  Sony has no control over that decision for games that Sony did not publish, which is most of the PSP games. Also, any PSP can download and play games from the Playstation Store.  It isn't a feature of the PSP Go. The PSP Go has the limitation of only being able to play games from the Playstation Store. The PSP-3001 can play PSP games from any store, including the Playstation Store.  Obviously you should have purchased a PSP-3001.  You could have purchased most of your games in the Playstation Store and carried them on tiny Memory Stick Pro Duos, and you still would have had the option of putting a UMD in the drive if you wanted to play a game that wasn't available for download.  The research that you did prior to purchasing your PSP Go must have been faulty if you failed to become aware of that option.  Unfortunately, there is nowhere that you can send yourself for a refund or exchange either.  Your next best option is probably to trade in your PSP Go towards the PSP-3001 and memory stick that you should have purchased in the first place.


One thing I would like to point out that I think a lot of people forget already is that before the PSP Go was released, there weren't very many PSP games on PSN except for the PSN exclusives and PS1 Classics.   This doesn't seem like a PSP Go-bashing thread, but in defense of the Go, it's release has really been a benefit for all PSP owners and future adopters of the PSP platform.  If anything, having all those games up on PSN should also help PSP-3000 sales because of the option to buy game both on UMD and digitally.  It's a lot easier to get classic PSP games from PSN rather than searching for used discs.


My intentions aren't to "bash" the PSPgo exactly..  It's by far my favorite PSP I've owned.  It's just unfortunate that the digital download content isn't there (KH:BBS as the main example, I'm sure there's many other games).  It just annoys me that after a year of it's release, digital content is withheld by developers, even though the price of the game remains the same as a UMD.  Sony charges so much per GB to the developers, and I guess Disney has this....fear I guess, since they're the ones who said no to DDs.

 


They also neeed to get testers for DD so we can avoid glitches, like gta and slow framerate. I won't consider DD equal to UMD till then

 

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