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Jul 14 2013
By: Sejborg Lombax Warrior 120 posts
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The morale of the story (spoilers)

3 replies 333 views Edited Jul 14, 2013

In the utilitarianism discussion it said that: "...it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong".

 

An argument that many people can see the reasoning behind. But what when it comes to the sacrifice and death of the few - for the benifit of the many? Or maybe not even "few" - but just one? Sacrifice one so the many can live. 

 

As long the sacrificee gives her consent, it remains an argument that people can see the reason in. Controversiel? Surely. But the reasoning is still there. 

 

What Naugthy Dog adds to the discussion is that it is not a question of how many "few" you sacrife for the good of the majority. No - it is a matter of who you sacrifice. Quite a pragmatic argument in an otherwise idealistic discussion. But none the less I reckon it is a very true argument. If push should come to show, and I was in a similar position as Joel in the ending of the game, then I believe it would be a question of who, rather than a few vs. the majority argument that would be my number one factor in my decision making.

 

 

What do you think? What would factor in on your decision making? And what do you think is the morale of the story?

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Lombax Warrior
Registered: 06/25/2013
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Re: The morale of the story (spoilers)

[ Edited ]
Jul 15, 2013

In my opinion the the story is just that everyone will do what they have to do in order to survive. Nothing is black and white in this game. Everything is a shade of grey and nobody is really good nor evil. Even though they tried to make Ellie out to be a very likeable character that people could become attached to she still is (or rather becomes over the course of the game) an extremely flawed individual. But at the same time she is no more flawed than Joel, or Tess, or David. All of them were just doing what they had to do to survive and if that meant having to steal or kill to survive then they would do that.

 

I think them ending it the way they did is 100% better than if they had her sacrifice herself at the end which in turn created a cure. The ending fit who she was much better as she was not a character that deserved much praise or idolization. She was no different than all the other thieves or murderers out there in the world who were just doing what they needed to do to survive.   

 

In my opinion that is the real story of the game and the whole 'cure' thing was just put out there as a set up so they could show how two characters were going to do whatever they needed to do to survive. 

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First Son
Registered: 07/20/2013
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Re: The morale of the story (spoilers)

Jul 20, 2013

The moral of the story:  Know when to let go.

 

Joel did the opposite and selfishly took Ellie away from the human race to make himself feel better.  

 

He did his job too well.  

 

He protected Ellie and made sure she was safe past the point where he should have.  Killing the very people that Ellie sacrificed her innocence to find (FireFlies at the hospital), betrayed Tess' dying wish for his own personal greed of needing a daughter figure in his life again because he found one he could love again.

 

He loved her so much that he damned the human race, truely making them the Last of Us.

 

He should have let go of Ellie at the hospital to save us, but he couldn't do it.

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Sackboy
Registered: 06/27/2013
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Re: The morale of the story (spoilers)

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Jul 20, 2013

ThaMoy wrote:

The moral of the story:  Know when to let go.

 

Joel did the opposite and selfishly took Ellie away from the human race to make himself feel better.  

 

He did his job too well.  

 

He protected Ellie and made sure she was safe past the point where he should have.  Killing the very people that Ellie sacrificed her innocence to find (FireFlies at the hospital), betrayed Tess' dying wish for his own personal greed of needing a daughter figure in his life again because he found one he could love again.

 

He loved her so much that he damned the human race, truely making them the Last of Us.

 

He should have let go of Ellie at the hospital to save us, but he couldn't do it.


"Us" being all the cannibals, Hunters, bandits, military (who made Sarah killed by the way) and that Malick-guy in the bus in the QZ. And us including Joel? Joel wouldn't have had any reason to live anymore, Tess had died and then would have Ellie. He would have been all alone... Bill wasn't that friendly.

________________________

I have acquired the grade of Master in The Last of Us story/character/game knowledge as I have played it through 9 times.

... I have no life.
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